Here’s to Everyone Who Tells a Story About Their Company

Brochures. Websites. Introductory sales calls. Presentations to a broad industry audience. These opportunities are far too often used by sales reps, marketing departments, and company leaders to provide a picture about themselves, what they make or do, how big they are, how many pins in the map they have.

And not often enough do the messages make a statement to the customer, buyer, prospect, or world at large that resonates with an internal need, a desire to understand “what’s in it for them” and to see value and uniqueness they’re hungry for.

When you look at a group photograph you’re in–don’t you look for yourself first?  Don’t you want to see how you look?  We’re all interested in ourselves, our needs, and “looking” at a company, product, or service we’re considering is no different.

 

  • “How would my situation be different if I used this?”Coke
  • “What could I have or get from using this?”
  • “How has this helped other people like me be better or get an advantage?”

 

And yet so many companies still get this so wrong. We create brochures that quantify our size and locations, list out our products lines, but miss the opportunity to get the customer to see how their situation will be improved through their association with us.

So going forward, let’s start with the outside in. Let’s position our message, our pitch, our company from the customer’s point of view.  And not make it all about us.

If you want to see a perfect example of this, watch Steve Jobs’ talk below made in 1997 a couple of months after his return to Apple.  Textbook perfection on how to appeal to your audience.

Best of luck!